Category Archives: Ealdríce Hæðengyld – A Theodish Fellowship

Beholdings on the Heathenness of Midsummer: Wyrms and Wells

Amid the leafs of Robert Plot’s The Natural History of Oxford-Shire (1686 CE), there is found an odd betelling of a yeartidely rite held at Midsummer.  In his delving into the lore of that land, Plot learned that the town … Continue reading

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Beholdings on the Heathenness of Midsummer: The Heathen Godhood of Saint John the Baptist

The 24th or 25th of June was the daymark upon which the Summer sunstead was fained in early Anglo-Saxon England (6th-8h hundredtide). Known then as Midsumor amongst the Anglo-Saxon Heathen and as the Housel of John the Baptist by Christians, … Continue reading

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On Midsummer, The Summer Sunstead, and the Housel of John the Baptist

As to the reckoning of the Anglo-Saxon Midsummer, we find that it first shared its daymark with the housel held by Christians to mark the birth of John the Baptist. As witnessed in The Old English Martyrology (800-900 CE), “on … Continue reading

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On May Day, Bældæg, and Beltane

As aforewritten in On Summer’s Icumen In, the English Christian May Day unseated the Anglo-Saxon Heathen holytide of Éastre as the day which marks the start of summer.  As such, we might well fathom to find amid its merrymakings, sundry … Continue reading

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On Éarendel

Wordlorewise, Éastre may well find kindship with another Anglo-Saxon god, Éarendel (ON: Aurvandil from the PGmc: *auzi- “dawn” and *wandilaz “wandering”). In the Prose Edda’s Skáldskaparmál, it is said that thunder god Þórr (OE: Þunor) sought leechcraft from the witch … Continue reading

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On Summer’s Icumen In

It may well astound some to learn that the yoretidely Anglo-Saxons did not reckon summer’s starting by the summer sunstead (solstice) as nowtidely men do today. Rather, the summer sunstead was known to them as Midsummer as it marked summer’s … Continue reading

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On Éastremónaþ, Éaster, and Éastre

Upon the Sunday following the first full moon after the Lencten even-night,[i] a housel is held throughout Christendom to recall their godling’s grave-rising.  Whilst known by most of Christendom as Pascha, the Latin name for the Jewish Passover, throughout English … Continue reading

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On Hréþmónaþ Also Called Hlýda

Amid the twenty and seven Anglo-Saxon year-reckonings that are known to us still, two Old English names are found for the moon-marked month which fell nigh the Roman March: Hréþmónaþ and Hlýda, which is sometimes called Hlýdmónaþ. Wordlorewise, Hréþmónaþ may … Continue reading

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On Solmónaþ, Pancakes, and Ploughs

Amid the Lenten traditions of the English[i], there may be found threads of yore-old heathen thew Christened long ago by the early Anglo-Saxon church. Indeed, such heathenish customs abide to this very day, though few who hold to them know … Continue reading

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On Solmónaþ and Lent

The moon-reckoned month known to the Anglo-Saxons as Solmónaþ, that is “Sun-month,” fell more or less about the month now known as February.  As betokened by its name, Solmónaþ marked the again-fairing of the sun, her waxing, and the lengthening … Continue reading

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